Monthly Archives: January 2010

‘My School’ Website — Save Our Schools

My School Comparisons Expose Hypocrisy of PM and Gillard

The Save Our Schools public education advocacy group today accused the Prime Minister and the Federal Education Minister of hypocrisy and duplicity about reporting school results. SOS national convenor, Trevor Cobbold, said they have broken each of their three key promises about publishing school results.

“The Prime Minister and the Federal Education Minister gave assurances that schools would not be unfairly compared; schools would not be “named and shamed”; and that they would not support “simplistic” league tables. My School shows they have failed to deliver on all of these promises. Their assurances are exposed as duplicitous.

“The Prime Minister has long said that government schools in disadvantaged areas would not be compared with “likes of Geelong Grammar and the rest” but this is exactly what My School does.

“Its local schools webpage compares the results of Geelong Grammar – one of the wealthiest schools in Australia –with government and Catholic schools in Corio and Norlane, which are amongst the most disadvantaged suburbs in Australia. Geelong Grammar has 1% of its students in the bottom quarter of the My School socio-economic index compared to over 90% for many other schools in the area including Corio PS, Corio South PS, Corio West PS, and St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic School. Continue reading

Tourism yes, but no human rights

“My father had a rawhide whip which his father had brought from Africa. He told us that it was a symbol of man’s inhumanity to man. As young children even before we really knew what the words meant, we knew that this whip was a thing of dread.” — Pamela Curr in American Torture, Aussie Style

You would think that a country like Indonesia that had thrown off the shackles of the harshest colonial master, the Dutch, would have more sympathy for others (the Tamils) yet to achieve independence. You probably could not expect the same of Australia, still under the yoke of dependence, formerly of the British and now the Americans.

Yet governments of both countries seemed to have learnt little from their own colonial experience.

On Australia’s invasion day (26 January 2010) Indonesian police detained two Australian and one Canadian refugee rights advocates.

Subsequently Indonesian Police and the Jakarta Post have published absurd allegations that three refugee advocates are human traffickers when all they have done is to visit NGO reps and refugees while on a brief stay in Indonesia.
The activists said the charges were changed when it became clear that Ms Nathan had been mistakenly identified as a notorious people smuggler of the same name.
”Initially I was associated with ‘Nathan’, a people smuggler,” Ms Nathan said. ”Later, they claimed we were in a restricted area near the boat, which is completely untrue.”
Since then all three of the refugee advocates were deported from Indonesia and grey listed for six months (i.e. are unable to return for that period).

National Police chief detective Comr. Gen. Ito Sumardi made the unfounded and unsubstantiated allegation that “We have preliminary evidence they were involved in human trafficking activities,” Ito told The Jakarta Post.

Pamela Curr and Saradha Nathan land in Sydney after being deported from Indonesia after crticising the the Australian Government's 'Indonesian solution'

The only questions raised by Indonesian officials was violation of restrictions placed on the visitors visa that the women were travelling on. In interviews held with the women police alleged a breach of visa restrictions which, as any traveller would know, are often based on arbitrary and ad hoc judgement by local officials.

The report from the Jakarta Post did not correctly identify the three women concerned and attempted to misrepresent their aims and those of the organisations for which they work.

This is sensational style of  journalism is only too common in ther mainstyream press. The Jakarta Post could have discovered the facts by ringing Ms Nathan or Ms Curr.

One of the women, Pamela Curr, is the Campaign Coordinator Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC) and has visited other refugee detention centres on Christmas Island, off the coast of Italy and in Britain. Ms Curr has not encountered threats like this before certrainly not the trifecta of questioning, confiscation of her passport and deportation that she received at the hands of Indonesian officials, clearly sending a message to Canberra.

Of course, Pamela Curr is not the first to be threatened, late in 2009 refugee activists received similar threats in Indonesia. No doubt Australian officials play a role in this to protect the Australian government.


Ms Curr went to Indonesia on a visitor’s visa on Wednesday 20 January 2010 to see first-hand human rights abuses in Indonesian detention centres and to visit the refugees at Merak. At one point Pamela Curr managed to scribble the following report:

“Went to Jakarta detention centre today to see 9 men in one cell and 5 in another. Just a few square metres , unpainted walls with desperate messages written in Arabic, Farsi, Tamil and other laguages of desperation by those incarcerated. Grubby old eiderdowns line the floor and there they sleep at night lined up like sardines. No amusements, no space , no air-one tiny window. Locked in for months.”

And so Indonesian authorities detained her twice, questioning her the status of her visa – it was meant for tourists but not to visit people concerning the human rights situation there.

Pamela Curr was clearly targeted by Indonesian authorities because of her record for supporting refugees held in detention in Australia by both Howard and Rudd governments. In this case Ms Curr was defending the rights of 240 refugees at Merak, Indonesia that the current Australian government will not permit into the country.

Mahendra, a local labour activist in Indonesia, is reported in the Jakarta Post article as refuting the claims made by Indonesian police.

Mahendra said the foreign activists were detained at Indah Kiat Port near the boat where the Australia-bound Tamil boat people were being held by Indonesian authorities.

The Labour activist  said that “the women had come to Indonesia to monitor how Indonesia has handled the 200 or so Sri Lankan boat people stranded in Merak for three months on a boat designed to comfortably accommodate 50 people.”

Ms Nathan said officials from Indonesia’s department of foreign affairs told her they did not want to warehouse Australia’s refugees and are frustrated that the government hadn’t taken responsibility.

“I think Indonesia is trying to give a message to the Australian government by harassing Australian citizens,” she said.

It seems that all the Australian and Indonesian governments, media and business community want is to foster tourism. They are disinterested in human rights when they refuse to accept their responsbilities to genuine refugees fleeing from countries that are the victim of colonial wars of oppression by western governments.

I stress that these are my own views written in response to an attack upon the three women mentioned in the article in the Jakarta Post titled: ‘Australians, Canadian held on human trafficking allegations’

It is my view that Rudd (Australia’s current Prime Minister) has only two choices over the refugee issue:

1) He can take the Howard (previous PM) option of refusing entry to refugees; or,

2) He lets all the boat people settle here in Australia.

This will mean that he must have the political will to cop the flack that will come from all the racist and nationalist groups.

Personally, I am for the latter option.

There is no middle road for the Australian government on refugee policy, lives are at stake.

Ian Curr
January 2010

Vale Alistair Hulett — eulogy by David Rovics

“There’s a man in my bed I used to love him
His kisses used to take my breath away
There’s a man in my bed I hardly know him
I wipe his face and hold his hand
And watch him as he slowly fades away” — Alistair Hulett, “He Fades Away

Alistair Hulett has has died.

Icon of Scottish folk music, international socialism, and Australian punk rock dead at 57

Today is my daughter Leila’s fourth birthday, and while this occasion brings my thoughts back to the day she was born, the past 24 hours have otherwise been full of fairly devastating news.

If the left can admit to having icons, then two of them have just died. Yesterday it was the great historian and activist Howard Zinn, with whom I had the pleasure of sharing many stages around the US over many years. Much has been written about Zinn’s death at the age of 87, and I think many more people will be discovering his groundbreaking work who may not have heard of him til now.

And then less than a full day later I heard the news that my dear friend, comrade and fellow musician Alistair Hulett died today. He was thirty years younger than Professor Zinn, 57 years old, give or take a year (I’m shit at remembering birthdays, but he was definitely still years shy of 60). Ally had an aggressive form of cancer in his liver, lungs and stomach.

I last saw Alistair last summer at his flat in Glasgow where he had lived with his wife Fatima for many years. (Fatima, a wonderful woman about whom Ally wrote his love song, “Militant Red.”) He seemed healthy and spry as usual, with plenty to say about the state of the world as always. He was working on a new song about a Scottish anarchist who had run the English radio broadcast for the Spanish Republic in the 1930’s.

Continue reading

‘Ted Kennedy: Priest of Redfern’ — a review

By Gary MacLennan

A review of Edmund Campion (2009) Ted Kennedy: Priest of Redfern: Melbourne: David Lovell Publishing

There is a thought that has haunted me for a long time…It is to portray a wholly good man. Nothing is more difficult …especially in our time. (Dostoevsky quoted in Wyschogrod, 1990, p.1)

Edmund Campion has given us a fine book which is valuable on two accounts. Firstly it is a narrative of the life of the radical priest and “wholly good man” Ted Kennedy. Secondly it is a history of the alternative church within the official Roman Catholic Church. It is the alternative church that provided the milieu from which Kennedy emerged. The argument (largely implied) in Campion’s text is that to understand Kennedy one must recognize and give credit to the existence of the church that existed largely in opposition to the official clerical church. Continue reading

Foco Nuevo News 2010


We hope that you’ve had a good break and wish all our supporters a very happy 2010.We are starting the year in a new venue which promises to be a stable home for us for the year. Souths League Club at Davies Park, West End, has generously agreed to host Foco Nuevo.

NEW VENUE for FOCO NUEVO: Souths Leagues Club
Davies Park
Cnr Jane St and Montague Rd West End (enter from Jane St)

NEW TIME: First Friday of the month

ENTRY: $10 / $7 concession

We are now planning our program for 2010, which will feature guest musicians who share our passion for music outside the mainstream.

Also for 2010 we are shifting Foco Nuevo to the
first Friday of the month with the first for 2010 being on February 5.

February will kick off with Little Secrets and Ann Bermingham and Helen Rowe. We’ll send details shortly.

Souths is a fully licensed venue, so for the first time Foco Nuevo regulars will be able to buy drinks at the bar.

Maggie will be providing her delicious cakes, with tea and coffee. (Unfortunately meals won’t be available until the kitchen is refurbished.)

We’re looking forward to a good year, so invite your friends!

see you there,

Lachlan and Sue


Click here for a map to get there —


FULLY LICENSED

NEW TIME

First Friday of the month

ENTRY
$10 / $7 concession

web
www.foconuevo.org.au

email
Lachlan
Sue

YouTube
!

Merak Refugee Supporters Detained

This article has beee taken down upon request to protect refugee advocates involved.

Phil Monsour goes to Jerusalem

Phil Monsour News and Information
Phil Monsour News and Information

Hi All
Finally some news .

I will be traveling to the Middle East on the 20th of February as part of the Union Aid Abroad – APHEDA Middle East study tour. The APHEDA tour will take ten union officials a politician (and me) to Lebanon, Jordan and the Occupied Palestinian Territories (including the Gaza Strip) to meet with APHEDA project partners, Unions and non government organisations. APHEDA has received the bulk of the funds from all the concerts of the last few years.

I have received some assistance from the Queensland Teachers Union but the majority of my trip is self funded. I will be having a tour fund raising concert and farewell party on the 19th of Feb at the CEPU Union Hall at 41 Peel St South Brisbane [the entrance is on Merivale Street] to help raise funds for the trip. I also hope to purchase a good quality video camera and digital camera to bring back some images and stories to use at my concerts.
There will be a cheap light meal and drinks available and your support would be greatly appreciated. Tickets $10 (see poster below)

I will also be using my facebook site to document he trip (see below if you want to be Friends)

You can also help by purchasing CDs or the new DVD – live at Ahimsa House that includes 15 songs and a 30 min documentary about the songs and related issues.

Other Gigs
The band will also be performing in acoustic mode at the Muddy Framer in Annerly on Thursday the 11th of Feb 7.30pm.

The $30 CD pack of Lies and silence and the Empires new clothes is now available on the website.

Hope to see you if you can make it to a gig and any support for the Middle East study tour would be fantastic. Please forward to anyone who would be interested.
Thanks Phil
http://www.philmonsour.com/
http://www.youtube.com/PhilMonsour
http://www.myspace.com/philmonsour
http://www.facebook.com/people/Phil-Monsour/674368570

Our mailing address is:
Phil Monsour
,

Copyright (C) 2009 Phil Monsour All rights reserved.

Phil Monsour CDs

The Empires new clothes
13 song CD
Recorded with the full band

Lies and Silence
12 song CD
Solo acoustic recordings

Smart bombs
7 song CD
Recorded with a full band

‘I Want to See’: film review

This is one of GOMA film screenings under the theme The Promised Lands .

Click on this link for details of the films being screened at GOMA under this theme and others.

*********************************************************

Je Veux Voir : Film Review

The French have a long history in Lebanon even before the Treaty of Versailles carved up the middle east to give France a mandate over this part of Syria. This followed the defeat of the Ottoman empire and the new world order after the first world war.

So it is little wonder that the film producers of ‘Je Veux Voir’ would want to bring A famous french actor, Catherine Deneuve, to see the destruction of southern Lebanon by Israeli bombers during Israel’s invasion of Lebanon in 2006. It was this event (the bombing of Lebanon) that prompted me to launch this website on the day that the invasion started 13 July 2006. Arabic actor, Rabih Mroueh, takes Deneuve on a drive through Beirut down to the frontier in the south, a kind of road documentary through mine fields laid by Isradeli soldiers that still cause cows to blow up.

THE side view of the new Gallery of Modern Art at Kurilpa Point where free films are screened on Wednesdays and Fridays at 6pm. See Goma website for details.Picture: David Kelly

Along the road we see the pictures of the martyrs who died during the conflict, their posters hanging from electricity poles beside the road. Deneuve devotes one day to Lebanon in this documentary. We see a lot of the south of Lebanon including the village where Rabih Mroueh’s  grandmother used to live, now destroyed so thoroughly that Mroueh could not recognise her house.

Lebanon is very mountainous and the those mountains represent a cutural divide of sorts as well. To the West is Europe with its cultural effect on Beirut and to the east, Damascus and the cultural allegiance to Arab culture — sometimes confused by Westerners as Musllim culture.

Behind the images in the film footage you could see how influential Hezbollah is in Lebanon, drawing allegiance from christians and muslims alike.

Many countries play out their strategic war games in Beirut and after the drive we see Deneuve dressed to kill at a function for foreign diplomats, UN representatives and various politicians who treat Denueve like royalty, the queen of celebrity who traversed landmined districts to see what happened in this ancient land.

Regardless of motive I am glad Deneuve decided to do this project because she asked questions of Rabih Mroueh who provided the background of the war. Deneuve herself was paranoid of driving without her seat belt done up, which was a little ironic given the dangerous nature of the country she was in.

I would have liked to know more about the war and less about the celebrity angle of Deneuve exploited in the film.

Ian Curr
January 2010

Trailer for the Lebanese movie “I want to see” by Joanna Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, starring Catherine Deneuve. [Arabic: الشريط الدعائي للفيلم اللبناني “بدّي شوف” للمخرجين جوّانا جاجي توما وخليل جريج، بطولة كاثرين دونوف]

[Details of Film “Je veux voir” par Joanna Hadjithomas et Khalil Joreige avec Catherine Deneuve Category:  je veux voir بدّي شوف خليل جريج جوانا جاجي —Bande-annonce du film Libanais “Je veux voir” par Joanna Hadjithomas et Khalil Joreige avec Catherine Deneuve]

Coming up

Sayat Nova aka The Colour of Pomegranates

1968

3.30pm Sun 24 Jan 2010 / Cinema A GOMA

‘Sergei Paradjanov’s first film after his Ukrainian masterpiece Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors was a paean to his own Armenian heritage, an exotic mosaic of the mystical and historical that achieves a surreal effect (the more so, the less we comprehend the actual symbolism).

In tracing the life of the great 18th century Armenian poet and monk Sayat Nova through his writings, Paradjanov weaves a metaphorical short history of the Armenian nation, telling of Turkish genocide, Persian invasions, and a vast migration to the Russian section in the early 20th century, all through daringly symbolic imagery. (Sayat Nova himself died during one of the Persian invasions.)

Beyond this the film is an extraordinary artistic rendering of ceremony and ritual, architecture, iconography and colour symbology (eg. the colour of pomegranates) that, even for the uninitiated, works its extraordinary magic.’ Pacific Film Archive

35MM, COLOUR, MONO, 79 MINUTES, ARMENIA/USSR, ARMENIAN (ENGLISH SUBTITLES) / DIRECTOR/SCRIPT: SERGEI PARAJANOV / BASED ON THE POEMS BY SAYAT NOVA / CINEMATOGRAPHER: SUREN SHAKHBAZYAN / EDITORS: SERGEI PARAJANOV, M PONOMARENKO / PRINT SOURCE/RIGHTS: NORA ARMANI



Aside

Every year my friends gather on New Years eve and try to predict what will happen in the coming year. We place these predictions in a book and then in the following new year’s eve we read them to compare … Continue reading

Films about the Middle East and Asia at GOMA

The APT6 Cinema program continues to be a highlight for visitors to the Gallery of Modern Art’s Australian Cinémathèque. Over the next two weeks there is a variety of films from our two major cinema projects The Cypress and the Crow: 50 Years of Iranian Animation and Promised Lands, as well as APT6 filmmakers Ang Lee and Takeshi Kitano.

The Cypress and the crow: 50 Years of Iranian Animation

The Cypress and the Crow highlights the art of animation in Iran today, which draws on the artistic heritage of textile design; Persian folk tales and literature; calligraphy and miniature painting; as well as the motifs of interior design, ceramics and architecture. Animation is recognised in Iran as a medium which is closely related to drawing, painting and the graphic arts.

One of the films is Persepolis about a young girl who grew up during the events of 1978 in Iran. The US puppet, the Shah, was deposed only to be replaced by the religious fundamentalist, Ayatollah Khomeini. Through the years of repression that followed the young girl grows up only to flee into exile. The story told here is consistent with that of the narrative novel, Reading Lolita in Teheran. It is made more prescient (knowledge of events before they take place) in that the opponents of the Shah were prepared to support the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamic regime despite clear indications from the outset that it would be repressive and fundamentalist. Some French intellectuals (Michel Foucault) threw in their support, almost regardless of the result.

Promised Lands profiles a series of key cinematic and geopolitical relationships across the Indian

Promised Lands

subcontinent (Bangladesh, India, Kashmir, Pakistan and Sri Lanka) to

West Asia and the Middle East (including Afghanistan, Armenia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Kurdistan, Lebanon, Palestine and Turkey).

APT6 CINEMA
SCREENINGS: January – March 2010
WHERE: Australian Cinémathèque, Gallery of Modern Art

COST: Admission Free

What roles can the Union and Green movements play in Key themes: Saving the planet?

One-day Conference Saturday 6 February 2010

What roles can the Union and Green movements play in Key themes: Saving the planet?

  • Is it a case of workers’ jobs versus saving the environment?
  • Does the environmental movement need unions?
  • The history of the interface of environmental and union campaigns.
  • How can working people and unions contribute to environmental campaigns?
  • How can the environment movement engage more meaningfully with unions?
  • What kinds of red/green activism could be helpful for the future?

Unions have had a long-running involvement in Green issues, from the early Chartist struggles against factory pollution to US auto workers’ struggles to clean up the Great Lakes.

Australian examples include the role of unions and their members in saving the Barrier Reef from oil drilling, and the iconic Green Bans.

Yet the tensions between union and greens remain .

How can an understanding of the history of both movements contribute to closer cooperation in the future as we face increasingly severe environmental problems?

Keynote Speakers

Jack Mundey – union and environmental activist and Green Bans campaigner (Sponsored by Queens/and Council of Unions)

Ian Lowe – Emeritus Professor at Griffith University and prominent environmentalist

Tony Maher – National President of the Mining Division of the CFMEU

Queensland College of Art 226 Grey Street Griffith University South Bank Brisbane, Queensland 9am – 6pm (Registration 8.30am)

Further information:

Email: sr.music@bigpond.com
Phone: 33665318/ (0408 782983)
Web:  Red, Green and In-between: Reviewing Labour and the Environment in Historical Context

The Brisbane Labour History Association in association with The Australian Society for the Study of Labour History and The Centre for Work, Organisation and Well-being and The Department of Employment Relations, Griffith University

REGISTRATION FORM

The completed registration form is also your Tax Invoice

PERSONAL DETAILS •

Given Name … ….. ……….. ………… … ……….. ……… ….. ……. … ….. … .

Surname …….. …………. ….. .. ….. ….. … ………. .. …… ….. .. .. …… .. …… .

Organisation ……………….. ….. …….. ….. …. … … …. .. ……. ….. ……….. .

Postal address … … …………. …….. .. …. … .. … …………. ……….. …….. .

Suburb State Postcode Tel E-mail Fax

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION: $40 waged, $20 unwaged ** (Special deal! Conference + BLHA membership $50/ $25) ** ( ) Registration feels @ $ Fee includes morning teallunch/afternoon tea. • (please advise any special dietary requirements) •

PAYMENT OPTIONS (a) By cheque: = $ • Make cheque payable to Brisbane Labour History Association (b) Paying by EFT (Electronic Funds Transfer): Commonwealth Bank of Australia BSB 064000 Account # 10005764 Account Name: Brisbane Labour History Association (c) By money order CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS Registrations are fully transferable and non-refundable. If the primary registered delegate is unable to attend please advise the I alternative attending delegate ‘s details. Further information: Email : sr.music@bigpond.com Phone: 336653181 (0408 782 983) Web: http://www.asslh.org.au/

REGISTRATION MAILING ADDRESS Please return the completed registration form with your payment details to: The Secretary . Brisbane Labour History Association PO Box 5299 West End Qld 4101

PRIVACY DISCLOSURE Brisbane Labour History Association (BLHA), The Australian Society for the· Study of Labour History (ASSLH), and Griffith University (GU) respect your I privacy and are committed to protect your personal information. We collect • this information so we may provide you with information about the I conference, opportunities and services.

This information may be shared with the sponsors and stakeholders of the Conference. Images, photographs and recordings may be taken during the course of the conference and may be I used for various marketing purpose by BLHA, ASSLH and GU.

You have the· right to access your personal information and if you do not wish your details I to be passed to sponsors and stakeholders, please inform the conference secretariat by e-mail to Janis Bailey<j.bailey@griffith.edu.au>.

I
One-day Conference
Saturday 6 February 2010
What roles can the
Union and Green movements play in
Key themes:
Saving the planet?


Is it a case of workers’ jobs versus saving the environment?
Does the environmental movement need unions?
• The history of the interface of environmental and union campaigns.
• How can working people and unions contribute to environmental campaigns?
• How can the environment movement engage more meaningfully with unions?
• What kinds of red/green activism could be helpful for the future?
Unions have had a long-running involvement in Green issues, from the early Chartist
struggles against factory pollution to US auto workers’ struggles to clean up the Great
Lakes. Australian examples include the role of unions and their members in saving the
Barrier Reef from oil drilling, and the iconic Green Bans.
Yet the tensions between union aflO-§Feefl ffimLements remain . How can an
understanding of the history of both movements contribute to closer cooperation in the
future as we face increasingly severe environmental problems?
Keynote Speakers
Jack Mundey – union and environmental
activist and Green Bans campaigner
(Sponsored by Queens/and Council of Unions)
Ian Lowe – Emeritus Professor at Griffith
University and prominent environmentalist
Tony Maher – National President of the
Mining Division of the CFMEU
Queensland College of Art
226 Grey Street
Griffith University
South Bank
i!.risbane, Queensland
9am – 6pm (Registration 8.30am)
Further information:
Email: sr.music@bigpond.com
Phone: 33665318/ (0408 782983)
Web: http://www.asslh.org.au/
11’Ioe AusIral iall Socie!”)’ e Q
for the SIud” of t c ueenSlatnd
. .. • onserva IOn
, : Laoour Hlslory ~
Woodford Folk
.Festival

Saving the Planet?
Red, Green and In-between:
Reviewing labour and the Environment in Historical Context
A conference organised by the Brisbane Labour History Association, The Australian Society for the
Study of Labour History, The Centre for Work, Organisation and Well-being and The Department of
Employment Relations, Griffith University.
In addition to the keynote speakers, a range of papers will be presented by both activists and
academics on:
The difficulties of joining trad itional
leftism and radical–environmentalism
Climate change and non-adversarial union
activism
Young people’s role in bridging the
red/g reen divide
Is Green the new Left?
The ‘Earthworker’ story
The role of ‘green’ documentary makers
Community initiatives to save the
George’s River in Sydney
Community and union action that led to
the creation of Mt Lesueur National Park
in WA
Attempts to preserve a significant Maori
site in Auckland
Solidarity with non-human animals
Papers are still being sought from activists. If you have an interesting issue to present, please
contact Dale Jacobsen, sr.music@bigpond.com with a 3~-SO-word summary and a 30-50-
word biography by the end of December.
———————- Red, Green and In-between:
Reviewing Labour and the Environment in Historical Context
The Brisbane Labour History Association
in association with
The Australian Society for the Study of Labour History
and
The Centre for Work, Organisation and Well-being
and
The Department of Employment Relations, Griffith University
IREGISTRA TION FORMI
The completed registration form is also your Tax Invoice
PERSONAL DETAILS
• Given Name … ….. ……….. ………… … ……….. ……… ….. ……. … ….. … .
Surname …….. …………. ….. .. ….. ….. … ………. .. …… ….. .. .. …… .. …… .
Organisation ……………….. ….. …….. ….. …. … … …. .. ……. ….. ……….. .
Postal address … … …………. …….. .. …. … .. … …………. ……….. …….. .
Suburb State Postcode
Tel
E-mail
Fax
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION: $40 waged, $20 unwaged
** (Special deal! Conference + BLHA membership $50/ $25) **
( ) Registration feels @ $
Fee includes morning teallunch/afternoon tea.
• (please advise any special dietary requirements)
• PAYMENT OPTIONS
(a) By cheque:
= $
• Make cheque payable to Brisbane Labour History Association
(b) Paying by EFT (Electronic Funds Transfer):
Commonwealth Bank of Australia BSB 064000 Account # 10005764
Account Name: Brisbane Labour History Association
(c) By money order
CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS
Registrations are fully transferable and non-refundable. If the •
primary registered delegate is unable to attend please advise the I
alternative attending delegate ‘s details.
Further information:
Email : sr.music@bigpond.com
Phone: 336653181 (0408 782 983)
Web: http://www.asslh.org.au/
REGISTRATION MAILING ADDRESS
Please return the completed registration form with your payment details to:
The Secretary
. Brisbane Labour History Association
PO Box 5299
West End
Qld 4101
PRIVACY DISCLOSURE
Brisbane Labour History Association (BLHA), The Australian Society for the·
Study of Labour History (ASSLH), and Griffith University (GU) respect your I
privacy and are committed to protect your personal information. We collect •
this information so we may provide you with information about the I
conference, opportunities and services. This information may be shared with
the sponsors and stakeholders of the Conference. Images, photographs and •
recordings may be taken during the course of the conference and may be I
used for various marketing purpose by BLHA, ASSLH and Gu. You have the·
right to access your personal information and if you do not wish your details I
to be passed to sponsors and stakeholders, please inform the conference •
secretariat bye-mail toJanisBailey<j.bailey@griffith.edu.au>.
With special
thanks to:
“””‘- Que~r1e.18nd ~ Con””rvGl’Cion
I ThC Au:’Otrali~ln Soci e ly
for the Study of
. LllboUf Aisto,ry
Woodford Folk
Festival
~.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.
-I One-day Conference Saturday 6 February 2010 What roles can the Union and Green movements play in Key themes: Saving the planet? • • Is it a case of workers’ jobs versus saving the environment? Does the environmental movement need unions? • The history of the interface of environmental and union campaigns. • How can working people and unions contribute to environmental campaigns? • How can the environment movement engage more meaningfully with unions? • What kinds of red/green activism could be helpful for the future? Unions have had a long-running involvement in Green issues, from the early Chartist struggles against factory pollution to US auto workers’ struggles to clean up the Great Lakes. Australian examples include the role of unions and their members in saving the Barrier Reef from oil drilling, and the iconic Green Bans. Yet the tensions between union aflO-§Feefl ffimLements remain . How can an understanding of the history of both movements contribute to closer cooperation in the future as we face increasingly severe environmental problems? Keynote Speakers Jack Mundey – union and environmental activist and Green Bans campaigner (Sponsored by Queens/and Council of Unions) Ian Lowe – Emeritus Professor at Griffith University and prominent environmentalist Tony Maher – National President of the Mining Division of the CFMEU Queensland College of Art 226 Grey Street Griffith University South Bank i!.risbane, Queensland 9am – 6pm (Registration 8.30am) Further information: Email: sr.music@bigpond.com Phone: 33665318/ (0408 782983) Web: http://www.asslh.org.au/ 11’Ioe AusIral iall Socie!”)’ e Q for the SIud” of t c ueenSlatnd . .. • onserva IOn , : Laoour Hlslory ~ Woodford Folk .Festival – Saving the Planet? Red, Green and In-between: Reviewing labour and the Environment in Historical Context A conference organised by the Brisbane Labour History Association, The Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, The Centre for Work, Organisation and Well-being and The Department of Employment Relations, Griffith University. In addition to the keynote speakers, a range of papers will be presented by both activists and academics on: The difficulties of joining trad itional leftism and radical–environmentalism Climate change and non-adversarial union activism Young people’s role in bridging the red/g reen divide Is Green the new Left? The ‘Earthworker’ story The role of ‘green’ documentary makers Community initiatives to save the George’s River in Sydney Community and union action that led to the creation of Mt Lesueur National Park in WA Attempts to preserve a significant Maori site in Auckland Solidarity with non-human animals Papers are still being sought from activists. If you have an interesting issue to present, please contact Dale Jacobsen, sr.music@bigpond.com with a 3~-SO-word summary and a 30-50- word biography by the end of December. ———————- Red, Green and In-between: Reviewing Labour and the Environment in Historical Context The Brisbane Labour History Association in association with The Australian Society for the Study of Labour History and The Centre for Work, Organisation and Well-being and The Department of Employment Relations, Griffith University IREGISTRA TION FORMI The completed registration form is also your Tax Invoice PERSONAL DETAILS • Given Name … ….. ……….. ………… … ……….. ……… ….. ……. … ….. … . Surname …….. …………. ….. .. ….. ….. … ………. .. …… ….. .. .. …… .. …… . Organisation ……………….. ….. …….. ….. …. … … …. .. ……. ….. ……….. . Postal address … … …………. …….. .. …. … .. … …………. ……….. …….. . Suburb State Postcode Tel E-mail Fax CONFERENCE REGISTRATION: $40 waged, $20 unwaged ** (Special deal! Conference + BLHA membership $50/ $25) ** ( ) Registration feels @ $ Fee includes morning teallunch/afternoon tea. • (please advise any special dietary requirements) • PAYMENT OPTIONS (a) By cheque: = $ • Make cheque payable to Brisbane Labour History Association (b) Paying by EFT (Electronic Funds Transfer): Commonwealth Bank of Australia BSB 064000 Account # 10005764 Account Name: Brisbane Labour History Association (c) By money order CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS Registrations are fully transferable and non-refundable. If the • primary registered delegate is unable to attend please advise the I alternative attending delegate ‘s details. Further information: Email : sr.music@bigpond.com Phone: 336653181 (0408 782 983) Web: http://www.asslh.org.au/ REGISTRATION MAILING ADDRESS Please return the completed registration form with your payment details to: The Secretary . Brisbane Labour History Association PO Box 5299 West End Qld 4101 PRIVACY DISCLOSURE Brisbane Labour History Association (BLHA), The Australian Society for the· Study of Labour History (ASSLH), and Griffith University (GU) respect your I privacy and are committed to protect your personal information. We collect • this information so we may provide you with information about the I conference, opportunities and services. This information may be shared with the sponsors and stakeholders of the Conference. Images, photographs and • recordings may be taken during the course of the conference and may be I used for various marketing purpose by BLHA, ASSLH and Gu. You have the· right to access your personal information and if you do not wish your details I to be passed to sponsors and stakeholders, please inform the conference • secretariat bye-mail toJanisBailey<j.bailey@griffith.edu.au>. With special thanks to: “””‘- Que~r1e.18nd ~ Con””rvGl’Cion I ThC Au:’Otrali~ln Soci e ly for the Study of . LllboUf Aisto,ry Woodford Folk Festival ~.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. –

Manifesto of the Communist Party

A ‘Manifestoon’

A comrade has pointed out the Manifesto of the Communist Party by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels has an animated version on YouTube. You can view it below. The animated version includes many Disney characters from the heartlands of capitalism. The animations used are excellent if a little dated — the cartoon refers to ‘our epoch’ as being the ’20th century’.

The Manifesto remains timeless although the facts used by Marx and Engels are based in the 19th century. Capitalism continues to evolve on its old themes of profit and growth based on the exploitation of workers.

Communist Mainfesto - LeftPress Edition - $2 from PO Box 5093 West End 4101.

Many years ago Leftpress Workers Printing and Publishing printed an edition with our own introduction.

“The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word oppressor and oppressed stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes” In reality for all the great changes since 1848 the injustices which first prompted the Manifesto still remain evident….

We seek a world free of the obscene competition for weapons of mass destruction and free of poverty, illiteracy and inhuman living conditions; a world where the word solidarity is not just an empty phrase but is an animated thing given flesh and breath with new economic and political structures which eliminate human misery and alienation. For us, although written more than a century ago, the Communist Manifesto remains a valid tool of criticism and source of inspiration (extract from the Publishers Note) – Reprinted by Leftpress ( 48 pages)

Ian Curr
Jan 2010

[Thanks to Don Wilson for the tip about the animation on You Tube]