Gallery

News from Kurdistan

The farming communities of Nahla Valley live in an idyllic setting. A gorgeous mountain river runs through the valley, winding through rice paddies, orchards and sesame fields. As autumn unfolds you see families in the field harvesting crops daily, using combine harvesters, tractors, and animals. Scarecrows dot the landscape and dogs wander up the dirt roads. Homes are bustling with activity and guests are served fresh yogurt and bread, homemade butter and fig jam with tea. Generations of farming families have lived peacefully on this land. 

Rebecca Dowling sends news from Kurdistan in northern Iraq.

A video on Zewka village displacement: 

https://cptik.org/videos-1/2019/11/10/bombing-or-flooding-zewka

A reflection by my teammate Julie on being in the bombings: https://cptik.org/reflections-1/2019/10/27/what-was-it-like

A new article I wrote a couple of weeks ago on the bombings: 

https://cptik.org/news-1/2019/10/19/we-are-always-aware-they-may-bomb-us

Rebekah Dowling, 10 November 2019


Turkish Bombs Destory Village Life in Kurdistan

“We are always aware they may bomb us”

Rice and sesame fields where two months ago a Turkish bomb struck.
Rice and sesame fields where two months ago a Turkish bomb struck.

One of the men from Hezanke harvesting hay to feed the animals.
One of the men from Hezanke harvesting hay to feed the animals.

The Turkish Military operations are destroying this peace. 

For over 25 years the Turkish Military has been bombing Iraqi Kurdistan. Towns and villages have emptied as thousands have been displaced; forced to move further and further away from the borders. 

Then, five years ago the Turkish Military began bombing closer to the villages of the Nahla Valley, about one-and-a-half hours north of the city of Akre. Since then families and communities have been torn apart as people flee. Those who remained hoped that things would get better, but have instead seen them worsen.

Sarmad Bnyamin, a teacher from the Hezanke school and resident there, spoke to CPT. “This [bombing by Turkish Military] has been happening since 1992, but in the last five years it has been getting closer, and this year it is much more frequent… We are always aware they may bomb us, even when we are sleeping, so we don’t sleep well anymore… We just want to leave Kurdistan now, we cannot stay here anymore while week-by-week it is getting worse…After every bombing we say, ‘God we are grateful that we were not killed today,’ but we know that tomorrow we might be.”

“After every bombing we say, ‘God we are grateful that we were not killed today,’ but we know that tomorrow we might be.”

Many of the people who have already left are those with children who are traumatised by the bombings. Sarmad told CPT how the students at his school are scared every time they hear a door close or a loud noise. The valley is on a major flight path, but the students can’t always tell the difference between passenger planes and the fighter jets and drones. So every time they hear the sound of planes overhead, they are scared and shaking. “It  is not only the children,” Kak Auetr said, “It is us as well. When we hear planes and we mistake them for drones.”

Suglta explaines to CPT how the noise of the bombing terrifies her.
Suglta explaines to CPT how the noise of the bombing terrifies her.

Suglta Bnyamin Yago, is 17 years old and a student in the Hezanke school. When the recent bombing happened on Sunday morning, October 6, Suglta was walking in the street and fainted in fright. She told CPT about the terror she suffers as a result of the bombings. Every time she hears a bomb exploding, she cries and her whole body shakes. 

Her family and community prays for Suglta and all their terrified children. But her brother, Sarmad, told CPT this trauma is not the problem to focus on; the problem is the Turkish Military bombing. “Please stop the bombings…After 5 years we are so tired, our minds are exhausted.”CPTIK

NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Please keep comments brief (moderated for spam only)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.