Refugee Rally at Pinkenba

Dear refugee supporters,
Please take note of the protest at Brisbane’s detention centre (the BITA)
next Saturday. Thye last one, in March, was a very special event. Just ask
someone who ake.was there. It was peaceful, very emotional and involved a
high degree of interaction with the detainees inside the fence. We hope for
a similar kind of event again, although we can’t guarantee exactly the shape
it will take. We hope you will come along and spread the word through your
networks.

Best wishes,

Paul McKinnon
RAC Qld, paul@rac-qld.org  , ph. 3392 3843
www.rac-qld.org

REFUGEE ACTION COLLECTIVE, QLD
Protest at Brisbane’s detention centre
Support refugee rights! End mandatory detention!

There are over 4500 asylum seekers currently languishing in detention in
Australia, with a federal Labor government that is thoroughly committed to
mandatory detention; and a federal opposition that says that Labor’s hard
line is “too soft”, and they will introduce even more cruel policies. Come
to Brisbane’s very own detention centre, the BITA, “Brisbane Immigration
Transit Accommodation” at Pinkenba and let everyone know that these policies
are unacceptable. Demand freedom and justice for refugees!

When: 2pm, Saturday 21st July.
Where: 100 Sugarmill Rd, Pinkenba.

Getting there: Trains arrive at Doomben station at 12.46pm and 1.46pm.
Carlifts will be organised from there to the rally site at Pinkenba. Could
all those with transport who are willing to give people a lift, be at
Doomben station at those times?

For further info, ring Paul, 3392 3843, or Mark, 3891 5385, or Tim, 0411 829
319.

This protest is organised by the Refugee Action Collective, Qld.
www.rac-qld.org

**********

Australia has treated Rohinya refugees abominably.
Friday, July 13, 2012          THE DAILY STAR

http://www.thedailystar.net/newDesign/news-details.php?nid=241923

Solution for Rohingyas

AFP, Yangon

The Myanmar president told the UN yesterday that his government would send
away the Rohingyas if any country accepted them.
Refugee camps or deportation was the “solution” for nearly a million
Rohingya Muslims in the wake of communal unrest in the west of the country,
he added.

Thein Sein, who had previously struck a more conciliatory tone during
fighting that left at least 80 people dead in Rakhine State last month, told
the chief of the United Nations refugee agency the Rohingya were not
welcome.

“We will take responsibility for our ethnic people but it is impossible to
accept the illegally entered Rohingyas, who are not our ethnicity,” he told
UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres, according to the
president’s official website.

The former junta general said the “only solution” was to send the
Rohingyas — which number around 800,000 in Myanmar and are considered to be
some of the world’s most persecuted minorities — to refugee camps run by
UNHCR.

“We will send them away if any third country would accept them,” he added.
“This is what we are thinking is the solution to the issue.”

However, UNHCR thinks the solution is for the Rohingyas to get citizenship
in Myanmar.

“Basically Myanmar does not consider these 7,35,000 Muslims in northern
Rakhine state to be their citizens and we think the solution is for them to
get citizenship in Myanmar,” UNHCR’s Asia spokeswoman Kitty McKinsey told
AFP.

“So we would not be very likely to assist in transporting them out of the
country and housing them somewhere else. As a refugee agency we do not
usually participate in creating refugees.”

McKinsey said the UN had been working for “several decades” in the area,
trying to promote reconciliation and “benefit all communities, not just the
Muslims”.

Communal violence between ethnic Buddhist Rakhine and local Muslims,
including the Rohingya, swept the state in June, forcing tens of thousands
to flee as homes were torched and communities ripped apart.

Decades of discrimination have left the Rohingya stateless, with Myanmar
implementing restrictions on their movement and withholding land rights,
education and public services, the UN says.

Unwanted in Myanmar and Bangladesh — where an estimated 3,00,000 live —
Rohingya migrants have undertaken dangerous voyages by boat towards Malaysia
or Thailand in recent years.

According to the UNHCR around one million Rohingya are now thought to live
outside Myanmar, but they have not been welcomed by a third country.

Bangladesh has turned back Rohingya boats arriving on its shores since the
outbreak of the unrest.

Although security forces have quelled the worst of the unrest, tens of
thousands of people remain in government-run relief camps with the UN’s
World Food Programme reporting that it has provided aid to some 100,000
people.

Both sides have accused each other of violent attacks, which were sparked
following the rape and murder of a local Buddhist woman and subsequent
revenge attack by a mob of ethnic Rakhines that left 10 Muslims dead on June
3.

A state of emergency is still in force in several areas.

— Pamela Curr Campaign Coordinator Asylum Seeker Resource Centre 12 Batman
st West Melbourne 3003 ph 03 9326 6066 / 0417517075 “AUSTRALIA. Built by
boatpeople.” [Ed. Note: migaloo = many waters, many travel = boatpeople]

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